Build & Install a Bath Cabinet Part 3 of 4 Hang the Doors

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Cabinetry and casework are fundamental to making built-ins and bookcases. This small wall-hung cabinet is a useful item for bathroom or kitchen, and it is a great project for a beginning carpenter to develop some basic cabinetry skills. It is also extremely inexpensive to make.

 

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Overview

Cabinetry and casework are fundamental to making built-ins and bookcases. This small wall-hung cabinet is a useful item for bathroom or kitchen, and it is a great project for a beginning carpenter to develop some basic cabinetry skills. It is also extremely inexpensive to make. The entire case, including the top, can be built from an 8-ft.-long piece of 1 x 10 wood (you’ll need a little extra material for the shelving and the towel rod). The mitered frames applied to the fronts of the door give the look and feel of a raised panel door, without any of the fuss.
We built the version of the cabinet you see here out of No. 2 and better pine and then gave it an orangey maple finish. You can choose any lumber you like for this, even sheet stock such as MDF, and apply a clear or a painted finish. For a traditional look, choose a white enamel paint. Be sure and apply several thin coats of polyurethane varnish, especially if the cabinet will be installed in a wet area like a bathroom.
Cutting List
Part
No.
Desc.
Size
Material

A 1 Top
3⁄4 x 91⁄4 x 191⁄2
1 x 10 pine

B 2 Sides
3⁄4 x 71⁄2 x 201⁄4
1 x 10 or 1 x 8 pine

C 2 Doors
3⁄4 x 9 x 15
1 x 10 pine

D 2 Shelves
3⁄4 x 7 x 161⁄2
1 x 8 pine

E 1 Towel rod
3⁄4 x 18"
Dowel

F 1 Wall cleat
3⁄4 x 11⁄2 x 161⁄2
1 x 2 pine

G Door molding (short)
1⁄4 x 3⁄4 x cut to fit
Retainer molding

H Door molding (long)
1⁄4 x 3⁄4 x cut to fit
Retainer molding

What You'll Need

Tools:

Pencil
Tape measure
Combination square
Router, profiling bit
Circular saw
Jig saw
Clamps
Hammers
Drill/driver
3/4" Spade bit

Materials:

(1) 8 ft. 1 x 10
(1) 4 ft. 1 x 8
(1) 3/4" Dowel
(1) Screen retainer molding (10 lineal ft.)
(2) Door knobs
(2) Touch latches
(2) Hinges
Drywall or deck screws
Finish nails
Finishing materials

 

Step 1

Cabinet Facing & Sanding the Cabinet

Cut strips of half-round screen retainer molding to make decorative frames for the fronts of the cabinet doors. Miter the corners (photo 9). The frames should be inset 1" or so from the door edges on all sides. Attach the frames to the door fronts with glue and a few 1/2" wire brads.
Note: Now is a good time to finish or paint your bathroom cabinet. Be sure to sand all the surfaces well and make sure you remove any dried glue—the stain and finish won’t stick to it. We used a gel-type Swedish maple stain on our pine cabinet because it imparts a rich color (it resembles orange shellac) and disguises the fact that pine has very little wood grain. We added three thin coats of wipe-on varnish after the stain dried


Step 2

Hang the Doors

Hang the cabinet doors with 1 1/2" brushed chrome or nickel butt hinges.


Step 3

Attaching the Top

In most cases, you’ll need to cut shallow mortises in the cabinet sides and door for the hinges. Center the cabinet top so the overhang is equal on the side and the back is flush with the cabinet back. Attach the top by driving a few finish nails through it and into the top edges of the cabinet sides, as well as into the top edges of the wall cleat. You’re better off not using glue to attach the top.
Install a touch latch at the top of each door opening.


 
 

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